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    Havana Bikes by Kauri Multimedia http://ift.tt/1qfrcu1
    — hace 1 semana
    #IFTTT  #WordPress 

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    During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

    A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

    Mission fucking accomplished

    Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

    It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

    You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

    The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

    The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

    Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

    So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

    Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

    These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

    reblogging for the sweet history lesson

    (vía ixnay-on-the-oddk)

    — hace 1 semana con 329948 notas

    Havana Bikes from Kauri Multimedia on Vimeo.

    JURIED PRIZE WINNER - 4TH ANNUAL BIKE SHORTS FILM FESTIVAL
    OFFICIAL SELECTION - BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL 2014 (NEW YORK, MOSCOW, HELSINKI, BOGOTÁ, QUÉBEC CITY) bicyclefilmfestival.com
    OFFICIAL SELECTION - BRISTOL CYCLE FESTIVAL bristolcyclefestival.com

    Cuba underwent a bicycle revolution in the 1990s during its five year ‘Special Period’. Oil was scarce as a result of tough economic constraints, and throughout those years of austerity, bicycles where introduced as an alternative mode of transport. Thousands of Cubans used bicycles on a regular basis, as pedalling became the norm on the island.

    Years later, the transportation crisis subsided and motorised vehicles returned, and the country’s bicycle culture took a hit. Now, new bikes are difficult to come by and parts are not readily available, yet many Cubans still use bicycles daily and, despite the limited resources, a handful of mechanics provide a service to those who rely on their bikes in their everyday lives.

    Plenty of cyclists roam the streets of Havana and the rest of Cuba. Ángel, a typical bike riding Habanero, provides a brief insight into Cuban bicycle culture and the importance of bike mechanics in the capital as we come across both riders and repairmen.

    *Music by VOLT HEIST: voltheist.com

    Read the feature story: diegovivanco.es/portfolio-item/havana-bikes-feature-story/

    — hace 1 semana
    Macro Portraits Of Ants, Spiders, Flies, And Other Insects

    Macro Portraits Of Ants, Spiders, Flies, And Other Insects

     

    Various insects and creepy crawlies gave their best looks to photographer Yudy Sauw, resulting in a thrilling and vibrant collection of photos that reveal their intricate colors and details. 

    Sauw treated these insects with much care by choosing to portray them as friendly, gentle creatures instead of highlighting its perceived pesky side in his macro portraits. 

    Can you guess the insects based on…

    View On WordPress

    — hace 1 semana
    "on ta mi bufandazul? nunca habia delirado por fiebre, hoy canté y baile en la playa desde mi cama, un speed de calentura, quien lo diria? from Facebook http://ift.tt/YbQUDZ via IFTTTArchivado en: Uncategorized Tagged: Facebook, IFTTT"
    — hace 1 semana
    #IFTTT  #WordPress 

    North Atlantic Skies from NATS on Vimeo.

    Every day, between two and three thousand aircraft fly across the North Atlantic between Canada, the United States and Europe. Airspace across the North Atlantic is divided into six Oceanic Control Areas (or OCAs). These OCAs are controlled by Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) working at different locations in different Countries.

    NATS, working with the IAA (Irish Aviation Authority), is responsible for providing the air traffic control service to the Shanwick OCA. The IAA service is provided from Shannon in Ireland, and the NATS service provided from Prestwick in Scotland (hence ‘Shanwick’).

    The Shanwick OCA is the busiest of all North Atlantic Airspace regions. It is often referred to as ‘the gateway to Europe’ and around 80% of all North Atlantic Air Traffic passes through it, demonstrating the strategic importance of our Prestwick Centre and UK airspace.

    This visualization shows Transatlantic traffic over a 24 hour period taken from a day in August last year and shows 2,524 flights crossing the North Atlantic, of which 1,273 pass through the Shanwick OCA. At our busiest periods in the Summer, traffic can peak at 1,500 flights a day passing through the Shanwick OCA.

    Find out more on our blog: nats.aero/blog/2014/06/north-atlantic-skies-gateway-europe/

    — hace 2 meses

    Never like the first time! from jonas odell on Vimeo.

    Short based on documentary interviews. Now with English subtitles…

    — hace 3 meses